Still from the movie The Royal Tenenbaums

The Royal Tenenbaums (2001), directed by Wes Anderson © Touchstone Pictures, courtesy of Touchstone Pictures/Photofest

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Movie Discussion Group: Wes Anderson

Online Class

Wednesdays, February 2 and 16, March 2 and 16, 7:30–9:00 pm (PT)

About the Program

Wes Anderson uses narrative, visual, production, and design elements that are meticulous and unique. His storytelling style is consistent in each and every one of his films. Through viewing clips, storyboards, and related works, we'll explore four of Anderson's movies and discuss the elements that make them enduring and enjoyable works of art.

Rushmore (1998)—The film that placed Anderson in the spotlight provides an entertaining kickoff for the series. Though one of his earliest efforts, it already contains the style and elements that imbue all his films: symmetry, color, irony, literary references, quirky characters, and inventive musical selections.

The Royal Tenenbaums (2001)—Anderson's burgeoning skills combine to create an inventive masterpiece influenced by French New Wave films and the stories of J.D. Salinger. Visual elements such as cross-decade fashions and nostalgic NYC streetscapes provide rich textures to this story of siblings whose glory days have passed as they face reconciliation with each other and the father who abandoned them.

Fantastic Mr. Fox (2009)—This stop-motion animated film about a thieving fox is described by the New York Times as being Anderson's "most fully realized and satisfying film [with] its wit, its beauty and the sly gravity of its emotional undercurrents."

The Grand Budapest Hotel (2014)—Anderson's highest-grossing and most acclaimed film at the time of its release is an episodic adventure about a fastidious hotel concierge and his protégé traveling through a sometimes foreboding 1930s European backdrop.


Facilitator: Theodore Rand has led previous film discussion groups at the Skirball on films of Billy Wilder and the Coen Bros., as well as a series on the science fiction genre. He is a graduate of New York University, and has held technology innovation positions at Miramax, Yahoo! Media Group, Fox Networks, and the Walt Disney Company.